Using QR codes for display

In a recent attempt to engage children more with our topic display, I’ve given using QR codes a go. I found the idea a while ago on Mr P’s marvellous ICT blog (my bible at the moment) and thought I’d give it a go. I was amazed by the results!

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Many of the children had seen these codes around but had no idea what they were, and had just let them fade into their periphery. They were amazed at the way these codes could bring up websites or text, for example, as if by magic!

We chose some of our favourite websites about our topic and created QR codes for them and now they are proudly displayed on our topic board. These have proved so helpful for quick reference during various projects, as well as providing useful tasks for children as extension tasks. During our last open afternoon, the children were desperate to show their parents these ‘magic codes’, and many parents have now had to download QR scanner apps onto their phones for future use!

Now that I’ve trialled QR codes with classroom displays, my brain is swimming with the potential for further projects. What previously struck me as a fairly useless ad gimic is now proving to be a real hit in terms of pupil engagement. They love them! At our recent school trip to the zoo, the children were spotting the QR codes in between rushing to see the meerkats and elephants.

I’m feverishly gathering inspiration from various sources online. Top ideas for future projects at the moment are:

  • A learning scavenger hunt with each code revealing another clue – could be perfect for consolidating learning at the end of a topic
  • Creating a guided tour of the school for visitors – perhaps just on the displays to help explain the process/story behind the work
  • Prompts in maths – maybe code on table could reveal success criteria/method so chn can look if their stuck but ignore it for extra challenge
  • Literacy books – could reveal definitions of word classes etc at back of book if they need it? Or connectives word banks?

Where to start? As it is the end of term next week, I love the idea of organising a scavenger hunt to consolidate the learning at the end of our current topic. I better get cracking on the clues!

Signing off x

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My newfound iPad organisation…

Today I’ve been busy preparing spreadsheets for my class facts and figures. I am utterly fed up of looking at messy handwritten notes and lugging around a huge planner all the time, so have decided to keep all of my levels etc on my school iPad. Obviously once my school moves away from levels it’ll need changing, but right now I am extremely happy with my new, streamlined life. Hopefully, my days of misreading my scrawl in progress meetings will now be a thing of the past!

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Look, it’s all shiny and smart!

If, like me, you fancy bringing your markbook into the 21st century, please feel free to download the templates below for maths, reading and writing. I’d recommend setting a password for these files just in case your beloved tablet falls into the wrong hands!

The pie chart is intended to show proportions of each fine grade in your class, and the Reports tab allows you to see each child individually.┬áThe ‘Progress’ tab is currently set up to work out sub-levels progress between KS1 and Autumn levels, as that’s out starting point in Year 3, but this ┬ácan be easily changed to reflect your own set up.

The spreadsheets are for use with the iWork Numbers app, but I have attached them as .xlsx below. If you would like them in .numbers format, message me using the About page contact form and I will forward them on to you. Being a bit of a n00b in terms of formulae (it’s been a long time since I regularly used media budget spreadsheets in a former life!), I’ve not quite ironed out the finer details on these sheets so any advice on how to improve them would be greatly appreciated!

Writing level template

Reading level template

Maths levels template